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the resume handbook how to write outstanding resumes and cover letters for every situation

the resume handbook how to write outstanding resumes and cover letters for every situation

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the resume handbook how to write outstanding resumes and cover letters for every situation

We may earn commission if you buy from a link.Maintaining a strong core and muscular balance with a regular workout routine that incorporates simple aids such as stability balls, medicine balls, and resistance bands can help prevent running injuries for years to come, without the expense of a gym membership. Enhanced flexibility using stretching tools can add to your performance on and off the roads. Self-massage will not only ease aches and pains, but can also improve a runner’s ability to stretch and remain injury free. Heat and ice therapies can minimize stiffness and swelling, keeping minor injuries from turning into major problems. Gel shoe inserts can add much-needed cushioning, delaying or preventing overuse injuries of the feet and legs. Pictured are some popular sports medicine aids used by runners on our staff. This grouping is by no means comprehensive.When you’re finished with your workout, it’s time for ice. Ice is the original anti-inflammatory, reducing swelling and pain. Apply ice for 10 to 15 minutes several times a day. Remove the ice if you experience pain. Applied directly to the skin, ice may cause frostbite, especially if your skin is wet. This problem can be avoided by placing a thin piece of cloth between skin and ice or by using commercial gel packs covered by material. Be careful for leaks when using chemical cold packs, as the chemicals can burn the skin. Bags of frozen peas and corn are also effective icing tools, conforming to the body with very little dead space. Ice massage is also quite effective. Freeze a paper cup full of water and roll the cup over the painful area—this is great for shin splints. A frozen can is very effective in the treatment of plantar fasciitis. Flexibility is vital to increasing and maintaining your stride length and range of motion, and is also a major factor in injury prevention. The best way to improve flexibility is through stretching.
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the resume handbook how to write outstanding resumes and cover letters for every situation.

Different athletes stretch in different ways, but the two most effective types for runners are static and active isolated. In the traditional static method, the muscle is stretched through a long, continuous effort. Active-isolated stretching is a newer technique. The muscle is isolated and the stretch is assisted by contracting the opposite muscle. For example, the quadriceps should be flexed during a hamstring stretch. An easy jog of 10 to 15 minutes is recommended to warm up the muscles. Stretching is not effective and can even cause injury if performed with cold muscles. An alternative to jogging is to do some light exercises: squats, leg swings, etc. You should try to stretch both before and after a run for at least 10 minutes, but if pressed for time, focus on post-run stretching. There are many stretching aids on the market that will help runners get the most out of a regular stretching routine. It is important to follow the instructions provided with these products carefully in order to prevent injury while improving flexibility. —Zika Palmer, Director ZAP Fitness MASSAGE Why Massage Is Important Though the immediate and long-term benefits of massage are difficult to prove, many top runners are certain that regular treatment at the hands of an experienced sports-massage therapist aids in their recovery. For those who want to train hard and repeatedly during a week, it is often between-workout practices and habits that determine how effective their labors ultimately become. Anything that facilitates recovery, a lack of scientific evidence notwithstanding, is certainly worth investigating. Ideally, everyone could get regular professional massages, but most of us have limitations in the time and money necessary. Learning to work on your own muscles is a valuable training and recovery adjunct. Working diligently on your calves, hamstrings and quads while you relax in front of the TV or even in front of your computer at work can be worth the effort.
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For best results, ask your massage therapist for tips. —Kevin Beck, Competitive Marathoner STRENGTH Why Core Strength Is Important Running is a complicated, interdependent series of miniature events that requires us to accelerate, decelerate and stabilize our center of gravity over our base of support. The most crucial part of this chain is the core of the body—the mid-back through the hips—where all movement begins and is governed. A strong core that has been developed in all three planes of motion provides the foundation for power (speed), efficiency of movement, and injury prevention. Many runners rely on superficial core muscles instead of the deep abdominal musculature to stabilize their gaits, and this substitution often leads to decreased neuromuscular control, muscle overload, and injury. Thus, although running does develop core muscles, specific core work is a very important aspect of training for all runners. —Sarah MacColl, ACE Elite Certified Personal Trainer You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io. We may earn commission if you buy from a link.A month or so later, a twinge settles on a knee. Runner stretches, pops ibuprofen, keeps running. A few—or maybe 100—runs later, runner is on the couch, ice pack on knee. What are the chances. The answer isn't exactly clear: A review of studies suggests that as few as 19 percent or as many as 79 percent of runners are sidelined each year. Many multiple times. Some—ouch—never run again. The best-selling book, which claims that the modern running shoe is the culprit behind the sport's high injury rate, got runners talking about shoes and form, and it spotlighted the debate about the cause of injuries. Is it the way we run. The shoes we wear? Because we sit all day. Or do we keep repeating training mistakes: big jumps in mileage; running the same five-mile route, on the same side of the road, week after week?
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Scientists are studying uninjured runners to decipher who gets hurt—and who doesn't—and why. One with a three-bullet chamber: a strong body, good form, and the right shoe. On the following pages, we take a closer look at each, offering exercises, form tweaks, and shoe advice that all runners can use to lessen their chance of injury and enjoy a long, happy, ice-pack-free running future. The glutes and core contract to steady the pelvis and leg. The foot and ankle muscles are activated, providing a solid foundation to land upon. Strong pathways help muscles fire more efficiently and in quick succession, which enables you to run with greater control and stability. You can do them as a full routine or insert them into your day while watching TV two or three times a week. If possible, do the moves barefoot. Bonus: You're also strengthening the transverse abdominus, a stabilizing muscle in your core. How: Begin on all fours with the bar across your lower back. Lift one leg back, knee bent at 90 degrees, keeping the bar still. If the bar moves, perform smaller movements. Do 50 reps on each leg. Bend your left knee 90 degrees and make contact with the wall. Push your knee into the wall and hold, while keeping your body stable (i.e., don't press your shoulder against the wall). Hold for 20 to 30 seconds. Do two or three sets on each side. You should feel the side of your hip (gluteus medius) working. Hold for as long as you can keeping the body tall. When you lose balance, rest, then repeat three more times. Lift up onto your toes, then slowly lower down until your heel is below the step. Start with a set of 10 on each leg. Build to three sets of 15. Bend both knees, keeping legs and feet aligned. Open the knees like a clam shell while keeping your feet together. Do two sets of 30 on each side. Next Level: Put a resistance band around your thighs. Lift your hips up off the floor so your body forms a straight line from ankles to shoulders. Hold.
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Once you can hold comfortably—and without your hips dropping—for 60 seconds, move on to a greater challenge. Next Level 1) Place your feet on the stability ball and cross your arms over your chest to perform the move. 2) From the lifted position, do single leg lifts, alternating lifting your left and then your right leg into the air. 3) From the lifted position, rotate your body in each direction, with control, to activate more core muscles. Walk your arms out, keeping your abdominals tight, until your shins are on the ball. Keep your back straight. Hold for 30 seconds; build to two sets of 60 seconds. Next Level 1) Walk out until just your feet are resting on the ball. 2) From a plank position with shins on ball, pull your knees to your chest. Once balanced, press your big toe into the floor and hold for 30 seconds. Aim for three sets on each leg. Next Level Standing on one leg, lower your hips back, bending your standing knee. Then push back up. If you can't keep your hips even and your knee aligned over your foot, stick with just the balance move. But they can also teach you how to minimize your impact on landing. If you're not currently strength training, add these moves after performing the other exercises in this program for eight weeks. Standing with the step directly in front of you, jump up with both feet landing softly. Step back down. Do 10 to 20 times. Next Level: When you can no longer hear your feet landing, jump up and then jump back down off the step. Aim for three sets of 10 jumps. Next Level: Switch out the pole for something taller, like a foam roller; the added height creates a bigger challenge. Breaking down these adhesions increases what's known as tissue mobility, which allows muscles to properly contract and lengthen. These exercises increase mobility in notorious problem areas for runners. Do them after a run. That can contribute to overstriding (landing too far out in front of your body), which puts more stress on the leg joints.

How: Kneel on one knee in a doorway so that your back is pressed against the inside of the door frame. Tuck your pelvis under so that you feel a stretch in the front of your thigh. For a deeper stretch, rotate your front foot slightly out. Hold for three minutes. Limited mobility can affect this motion and lead to problems all the way up to the hip. How: Sit down and prop one ankle on top of your knee. Using your thumbs, apply pressure to the arch of your bare foot, prodding for tender areas. Press firmly on any sore, tight spots, then flex and extend the toes to release the tissue. Do for three minutes daily until the soreness is gone. How: Sit on the floor with a foam roller under the calf of your extended leg. Roll your calf over the roller, and when you find a painful spot—a sign of knotted tissue—press into the roller. Hold until the pain dissipates (usually 30 to 90 seconds). Alter your position slightly and repeat. When that no longer hurts, ask a partner to press down on your shin to add pressure. Strength training can improve your form (makes it more stable, corrects imbalances), but it can't resolve faulty biomechanics. If you have knock knees, for example, you will need to train your body to run differently through a process called gait retraining, says Irene Davis, Ph.D., P.T., director of the Spaulding National Running Center at Harvard Medical School. In two studies, Davis gave runners visual and verbal cues to gradually retrain their movement patterns. The runners were able to correct their flawed form and maintain the new improved mechanics after just eight training sessions. Davis advises seeking out a physical therapist with gait-retraining experience instead of attempting it on your own. Without proper feedback, it's difficult to know if you're making the right corrections, she says. Other experts say the way we run is individual, and messing with it invites injury. (Find an in-depth discussion of this debate at Does Running Form Matter?.

) But there is some common ground: Both camps agree that certain components of form, such as good posture and proper stride (as demonstrated here by Olympian and world champion triathlete Andy Potts), can help prevent injuries. Here's a look at these elements. The muscles contract so they can stabilize the joints. If this line of communication is weak or slow, the muscles won't get this heads-up. If your back arches, your body weight tends to shift back, making you more prone to overstriding. Try This: Strengthen your core and upper body. Practice good posture during the day. Bad postural habits carry over to your run. An across-the-body arm swing tends to rotate the shoulders, or cause the trunk to sway, compromising core stability. Try This: Bend your elbows about 90 degrees and let your arms swing relaxed. Keep your elbows close to your body with your hands loose, which helps the entire body relax. And while midfoot- and forefoot-strikes minimize forces, experts agree that the greater hazard is overstriding—when the foot lands well ahead of the knee. Then lean forward and run for 50 yards holding that posture. Repeat three times before you run. Loads as high as 2.5 times your body weight pushing down on unstable hip, knee, ankle, and foot joints can wear down muscle, tissue, and bone. Try This: Engage your core muscles and imagine stepping over logs while you run. Some experts see the value if your easy stride rate is 160 steps or less (a sign of overstriding) or if you're injury-prone. Count every footfall. If you're above 160, not injured, and not overstriding (ask a friend to shoot a video of you and check your foot and knee position), there's little reason to change. If you want to experiment, increase it by five percent. It depends whom you ask. Some experts believe that landing on your mid- or forefoot, rather than your heel, greatly reduces injury risk, and some data supports that.

Others believe there's a strong chance you'll trade one injury for another because landing on the forefoot increases impact forces on the calf and Achilles tendon. Further complicating the matter: Studies show that it's difficult to know how you're striking the ground (you think you're midfoot- or forefoot-striking but you're actually heel-striking, and vice versa). The bottom line: If you're running injury-free, most experts say don't bother changing. But if you're chronically injured, footstrike is another tool that could aid treatment and prevention. If you decide to try it, the transition must be gradual (coach Eric Orton has his runners start with just 10 minutes of forefoot landing) and accompanied by plenty of foot, ankle, and calf strengthening. Try This: Focus on where your foot is landing in relation to your body, and land as close to your body as possible. Your lower leg should be vertical when your foot first contacts the ground. B2R running coach Eric Orton suggests this cue: When you run, rather than reaching with the foot, drive forward with the knee. Since it's tough to overstride when climbing inclines, he recommends incorporating a weekly hill workout into your routine to give you a feel for the correct form. Yes, shoes can reduce injury risk because they can alter your form and how the repetitive forces of running are applied to your body. For example, research shows that the firmness of shoe cushioning can influence the stiffness of your legs (i.e., amount of bend at the ankle, knee, and hip), which affects how forces impact your muscles, bones, and joints. If you're in a shoe that applies forces in a way that your body can manage and is a good match for your training (road or trail, for instance), the shoe can help reduce injury risk. Try rotating among a few pairs: A trainer for long runs, grippy shoes for trails, flats for speedwork, and minimal shoes for form drills.

The variety mixes up how force is applied and may reduce stress in the legs and feet. — Peter Larson, Ph.D., associate professor of biology at Saint Anselm College, coauthor of Tread Lightly: Form, Footwear, and the Quest for Injury-Free Running, and author of Runblogger You want a shoe that fits your biomechanics. Specialty-running-store assessments are helpful but not foolproof. My best advice is to go by comfort. If it doesn't feel good, it means it's putting stress somewhere you don't want it to. If you have aches and pains after you've run in a pair of shoes, it might be a sign you're in the wrong ones. If your shoe does feel good, it's likely a good one for you. — Benno Nigg, Dr.sc.nat., Human Performance Laboratory, University of Calgary, author of Biomechanics of Sports Shoes Our job is to find the shoe that best complements your foot shape and biomechanics. If we do that, we can minimize a shoe's role in the injury equation. Expect staff to ask about your training, look for wear patterns on your old shoes, examine and measure your bare feet, and watch you run in a few pairs. (If this doesn't happen, I'd go elsewhere.) When a shoe feels great and allows for neutral pronation—not too much or too little movement—it's likely a winner. — J.D. Denton, co-owner, Fleet Feet, Davis, California, and a 30-year veteran in the running industry There is no compelling evidence that says a minimal shoe will reduce injury. Some runners have switched and have had positive, transformative experiences. Others have been hurt and disappointed. Runners with smaller, leaner bodies, midfoot- and forefoot-strikers, and those with little or no injury history are most likely to make the switch without problems. Plus-sized runners, extreme heel-strikers, and anyone with chronic injury issues will take longer to adapt and may find that their more substantial, conventional shoes work better for them. — Martyn R. Shorten, Ph.D.

, director, Runner's World Shoe Lab, BioMechanica, LLC, Portland, Oregon Now what? Transition gradually. Spend the first week just walking in them. The following week you can start running in your new shoes—but wear them at most every other day for the first two to three weeks, and only do a mile or two in them. Whatever amount of running you start in your new shoes, hold at that level for at least a week. Then increase only by whatever your original amount was. Gradually introduce them to harder workouts. — Scott Douglas, author of The Complete Guide to Minimalism and Barefoot Running But for people with excessive pronation or flat arches, inserts can help. Studies show that an over-the-counter orthotic can be just as effective as a custom-made one, so try those first. If you still have pain, see a physical therapist who specializes in running. — Reed Ferber, Ph.D., director of the Running Injury Clinic and associate professor of kinesiology, University of Calgary You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io. Groups Discussions Quotes Ask the Author New thinking on injury and recovery suggests that runners can continue to train while injured. And alternative practices-s New thinking on injury and recovery suggests that runners can continue to train while injured. And alternative practices-such as acupuncture, chiropractic, and massage-are now virtually mainstream and an essential part of any runner's injury arsenal. Not only is the sport dramatically more popular, but women runners and beginning runners-who are a large part of the growth-have very different needs in the areas of injury and health that have not been covered adequately in previous books. Research in sports medicine also has advanced. All this-and much more-is covered in Runner's World Guide to Injury Prevention by Dagny Scott Barrios, quite simply the best, most authoritative guide in the field.

Here you'll find: - The most important stretches for runners-and why you should not stretch an injured muscle - How (and why) to change your biomechanics and stride length - How to incorporate cross-training to prevent and heal injury - The most important strength-training exercises for runners - How to cope with the mental side of injury - Special concerns for young runners, women, and older Runners - The newest thinking in hydration Beginners and veterans alike will benefit from this expert guidance from the cutting edge of sports medicine and science. To see what your friends thought of this book,This book is not yet featured on Listopia.In the beginning I ran to lose weight, but I continued to run throughout the years to maintain my weight. After all those years, last year for the first time I suffered a running injury and had to reduce my running drastically (but I didn't stop altogether) to heal. My achilles tendon was hurt. I found out that I wasn't immune to injury, after all. I'm not going to say that if I had read this book beforehand I would not have In the beginning I ran to lose weight, but I continued to run throughout the years to maintain my weight. I'm not going to say that if I had read this book beforehand I would not have been injured, but I probably would have been smarter about training and I would have known better what to do to heal after the injury occurred. This book gives an introduction in injuries, compared to just typical aches and pains. It covers in great detail methods to prevent injuries, and then it provides information on how to treat them when they occur. It offers several different exercises for cross-training than can also help you to avoid running injuries, and it has chapters specifically for certain people and how they might be different. By different, I mean it has a chapter dedicted to children and another dedicated to women, and another dedicated to older runners.

I think that last one should be very helpful to me as I approach retirement age. I found this to be a very interesting read and I intend to keep it for reference. Barrios has done an excellent job covering this subject. This included some of the same exercises my PT has given me. On the other hand, the Strengthening chapter (Ch 5) does not do a very thorough job of explaining the importance of strong glutes in avoidin. I'm on the tail end of recovering from IT band syndrome that presented as hip bursitis rather than the more typical knee pain, so I'm looking for ongoing strength training. This included some of the same exercises my PT has given me. On the other hand, the Strengthening chapter (Ch 5) does not do a very thorough job of explaining the importance of strong glutes in avoiding overuse injuries such as ITBS.It does a fairly good job of describing injuries, what to do if you get one (of the few it lists), and how to prevent them. With that being said, there are not a lot of injuries listed in the book. I would suggest reading several other books on running to get a better idea of injuries as a whole.Learn how to get the most out of your running without needlessly breaking yourself or further exacerbating your injuries. She also has some great stretching and strength programs that I'm going to photocopy and keep next to my exercise ball. Anything to fix my stupid hamstring. Learn how to get the most out of your running without needlessly breaking yourself or further exacerbating your injuries. Anything to fix my stupid hamstring. This book isn't just for injury treatment but it talks heavily on injury prevention or at least serious injuries that can result from ignoring the warning signs. A must read for every runner. This book isn't just for injury treatment but it talks heavily on injury prevention or at least serious injuries that can result from ignoring the warning signs. A must read for every runner. Consequently, I learned a lot.

I thought it was easy to read and understand and the principals taught were good to know. Not much in there about HOW to run well or even HOW to train, mostly just what NOT to do, thought that was kind of annoying. Overall, glad I read it, but it's not all-encompassing by any means so I plan to read more running books. Consequently, I learned a lot. Overall, glad I read it, but it's not all-encompassing by any means so I plan to read more running books. Small running injuries can worsen if you do not rest properly and address the cause.Learned a lot! To view it,It was a good reference book and could be worth checking out again. I was hoping to find the key to being a healthy, life-long runner. There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Its requirements are simple: Lace up your shoes, and head out the door. Fortunately, many of these injuries are easily preventable. Though it requires a small investment of time beyond what you spend running, the benefits are well worth the effort. But even though it’s a simple concept, a multifaceted approach is the most effective. Incorporating strength training, allowing proper time for recovery, and using tools like a foam roller can all be beneficial. Since many of us lead sedentary lives outside of running, our muscles and joints aren’t always ready for us to jump into an aggressive training plan. What that means is that you can’t let your aerobic fitness (endurance) outpace your structural fitness (bones, tendons, ligaments and muscles). If you do, you’re setting yourself up for injury. Runners who overpronate, or roll inward more aggressively, have typically been directed toward heavier, motion-control shoes. In fact, the best way to determine what type of shoe works best for you involves asking an extraordinarily simple question: Is it comfortable. Keep your shoe selection simple, and don’t be swayed by fancy new technology. If the shoe fits well and feels good, wear it.

For most of us, making a major overhaul to our running form is unnecessary. Minor adjustments are the way to go. By shortening your stride and taking more steps per minute, you may lower the risk of injury by reducing the impact stresses with each foot strike. But the hallmark of any preventative program is simple: strength work. Once your structural fitness is in place, it supports your aerobic fitness as you continue to build greater mileage and speed into your workouts. Studies show that dynamic warm-ups (ones that involve active movement of muscle groups you’ll use in your workout) are more effective than static stretching. Research also shows that performing a dynamic warm-up before a strength-training session may help reduce post-workout soreness. Weak hips and glutes are frequently to blame for running injuries, and a strong core helps you remain stable when fatigue starts to kick in. These are critical to helping your body recover and absorb the previous day’s hard training. The following set of exercises will help runners of all ability levels build strength and prevent injuries. These moves address areas that are commonly weak in runners—especially for those of us who sit in an office all day.Lower your body until your left knee brushes the ground. Step back, and repeat on the other side. Once you have mastered forward lunges, there are a variety of others you can add to your routine, including twisting, lateral, diagonal and reverse lunges. Maintain a tall posture, and step down with the left foot. Repeat on the other side. Keep the motion slow and controlled, then return to standing. Repeat on the other side. Return to standing by activating the glutes. Keep your back straight and lower your body until your chest reaches the ground, then push back up. To modify, rest your weight on your knees instead of on your toes. Lift your hips and contract your glutes so you form a straight line from your shoulders to your knees.Keep your back straight and hold.

Studies in the Journal of Health and Conditioning show foam rolling tight muscles can help increase blood flow and relieve tension. Make sure you take in sufficient calories to fuel your body and help it recover efficiently. MapMyRun is part of the world’s largest digital health and fitness community, Under Armour Connected Fitness. Improve your overall health and fitness with our family of apps. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience.New thinking on injury and recovery suggests that runners can continue to train while injured. All this-and much more--is covered in Runner's World Guide to Injury Prevention, making it the best, most authoritative guide in the field. Here you'll find: - The most important stretches for runners-and why you should not stretch an injured muscle - How (and why) to change your biomechanics and stride length - How to incorporate cross-training to prevent and heal injury - The most important strength-training exercises for runners - How to cope with the mental side of injury - Special concerns for young runners, women, and older Runners - The newest thinking in hydration Beginners and veterans alike will benefit from this expert guidance from the cutting edge of sports medicine and science. New thinking on injury and recovery suggests that runners can continue to train while injured. Here you'll find: - The most important stretches for runners-and why you should not stretch an injured muscle - How (and why) to change your biomechanics and stride length - How to incorporate cross-training to prevent and heal injury - The most important strength-training exercises for runners - How to cope with the mental side of injury - Special concerns for young runners, women, and older Runners - The newest thinking in hydration Beginners and veterans alike will benefit from this expert guidance from the cutting edge of sports medicine and science. Learn about our books, authors, teacher events, and more. Aren’t we all!